Battling the Storm Within

Wednesday, October 16, 2019

UPDATE: 4th Annual 2019 MIWVE Conference - SERVICE: A Community Conversation - 11/16/19


JOIN US for our 4th Annual 2019
Michigan Women Veterans Empowerment Conference 

Saturday November 16, 2019
11 am to 4 pm - City of Southfield Parks &
Rec. Dept. 26000 Evergreen Rd Southfield MI

In partnership with MIWVE & the City of Southfield
Veterans Commission Organization.

All MIWVE's events are open to all veterans and military services members, the youth and the general public.

We served together as men and women in the Armed forces lets continue to serve in our communities, fellowship and network together as a whole.

Great response! Seating is limited so register now! It's FREE - Open to Public, all veterans and military service members, the youth and the general public are welcome to attend.

$5 Donation for lunch at the Door 50/50 CASH Raffle – Networking - Great Conversations - Establishing & Building Community & Relationships

Steller Nominee Recording Artist Michelle Flowers-Logwood - Will be singing the National Anthem - "The Star Spangled Banner" & during the lunch break time.

Her 1st album was a Stellar Nominee and charted the billboard at 35 of top 100. Her new single charted number 4 of the top 30 independent artist chart with Gospel USA.

Come out to engage in a healthy community conversation with our diverse panel of community leaders and other conference attendees for the purpose of building a safe, healthy and vibrant community
for all to thrive in. 

A Special Thanks to the City of Southfield and the Southfield Veterans Commission Org. for their continued support and partnership with MIWVE.

Contact Sgt. Stephanie J. Shannon Founder/CEO of Michigan Women Veterans Empowerment for more information.
    
What empowers you,
lets pass it on!

Phone (810) 373-5744

NEW MIWVE NEWS!!!
MIWVE has a NEW partnership with Edward Jones (EST.1922) to empower entrepreneurs and others to be financially successful in 2020!

Stay tuned for details...

SGT. Shannon (RET U.S. Army) appointed SGM. Jill Mathews (32 years RET.) U.S. Army veteran's advocate and community leader to serve as MIWVE's liaison
on the New MVAA Women
Veteran's Coalition. (MWVC)

Erika Hoover, MVAA's Women Veteran Initiative Coordinator & Strategy Analyst will be sharing more at the conference about their new women veteran's coalition initiative.
MIWVE had a very successful season of "Dirt Therapy" at all 4 sites located in Southfield, Detroit and Flint.

MIWVE will be launching in 2020
our NEW! Kidpreneur: Youth
Agribusiness program in Flint.

Details will be released soon...
Michigan Women Veterans Empowerment | (810) 373-5744 |

Saturday, October 12, 2019

These 90 Army posts have contaminated drinking water



As a Pentagon task force looks into unsafe drinking water on its installations, a new list of Army posts has been added to the roster of bases where per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances have been found in ground water as recently as this year.
Ninety active Army, Army Reserve and Army National Guard posts are on the list, obtained by the Environmental Working Group by Freedom of Information Act request, the findings of which were posted to the organization’s site late Tuesday night. The Army says that despite the confirmed presence of PFAS in the drinking water, no one is taking in unsafe levels of the chemicals, because their filtered water complies with Environmental Protection Agency guidelines.


More Men Are Speaking Up About Being Sexually Assaulted in the Military



Illustration for article titled More Men Are Speaking Up About Being Sexually Assaulted in the Military






The issue of sexual assault in the military is now widely acknowledged, and high-ranking military officials have started, due to sustained public pressure, to belatedly (if imperfectly) address it. And while the focus has largely been on the servicewomen who have been sexually assaulted, a new report from the New York Times is a reminder that sexual violence while serving in the armed forces affects large numbers of men as well. And more men in the military who have been raped and assaulted are speaking up. 

READ MORE>>>


Air Force Is Desperately Looking For People To Adopt Some Of The Retired Military Working Dogs


Military dogs want the same things people want when they retire: comfort, some peace and quiet, and quality time with their loved ones.
That’s not too much to ask for a pup who served their country, now is it?
While 90% of canine veterans end up with their handlers, a few end up available for adoption.
Air Force officials at Lackland Air Force Base, the San Antonio base are worried over the sharp disinterest faced by the retired military working dogs post-retirement.
While the trainee puppies who don’t make the cut for active duty are readily adopted, the older K9s yearn for a home but keep getting overlooked.


'Everybody's Overworked:' String of Suicides Raises Questions About Sailors' Stress Levels

Chief Religious Programs Specialist Ana Douglas, attached to U.S. 7th Fleet flagship USS Blue Ridge (LCC 19), attends a candlelight vigil in Yokosuka, Japan, in observance of Suicide Prevention month on Sept. 27, 2018. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Patrick Semales)
.

Three sailors assigned to the same ship died in apparent suicides in the last week, leaving some asking what more leaders can do to support troops as the military grapples with rising rates of self-inflicted deaths.
READ MORE>>>

Do veterans lack social-emotional skills? A major study finds that many civilian employers believe they do.



Just based off their resumes and cover letters, veterans’ military service is working against them when they apply for jobs in certain fields, a new study says.
The study — conducted by Duke University’s Fuqua School of Business and released Sept. 24 — found employers believe veterans are less suited for jobs that involve social-emotional skills and interacting with people than their non-veteran counterparts.
Veteran service organizations like American Legion, however, take issue with the study, saying it promotes the stereotype of veterans as brooding malcontents.


The National Guard’s suicide rate has surpassed the other military components



The National Guard’s suicide rate has climbed higher than the active duty and Reserve’s, according to an annual Pentagon study released Thursday. In response, officials are looking for new ways to help troops feel comfortable coming forward about their issues and getting help they need.
The most recent figure is about 30.6 deaths per 100,000 service members, according to the Defense Department Annual Suicide Report for calendar year 2018, well above the Reserve’s 22.9 per 100,000 and the active component’s 24.8.


In a First, Pentagon Releases Data on Military Spouse and Child Suicides




In what was hailed as the Pentagon's first-ever report on military family suicides, the Defense Department said Thursday that 123 spouses and 63 children took their own lives in 2017.

According to the inaugural Department of Defense 2018 Annual Suicide Report, the 186 deaths included 122 among of active-duty personnel families, 29 among Reserve families and 35 within National Guard families.
READ MORE>>>

To the Suicidal Mama Fighting to Stay Alive for Her Kids

Sad crying daughter hugging her mother with sad face on dark shadows background

Fellow Mama,
I see you lying there in bed, trying to will yourself to get up. I know some part of you might wish you hadn’t woken up this morning – that you could fade away into nothingness because it seems a hell of a lot better than dealing with the demons you fight off daily in your head. I recognize that question in your eyes: “Is this life really worth all the effort?”

Why your relationship is at risk when you leave the military



Leaving the military and transitioning back into the civilian world is a very high-stakes time for close relationships.
The military is more than just a unit or an organization — it’s a band of brothers and sisters. It’s a family. The situations you’ve encountered while in the military often create a level of trust unlike anything you’ve ever experienced before.
Even if you came from a tightly knit family, the personal bonds formed in the military are uniquely strong and intense. Your survival may have depended on it. You were each other’s keepers. You celebrated the great moments together and, in many cases, you faced tragedy together. You hold and share secrets you’d never reveal outside of your tribe. Together you have “embraced the suck,” and accomplished things that you would never have thought possible.


Active duty suicides are on the rise, as the Pentagon works on new messaging and strategy



The rate of active duty service members who take their own lives has been rising an average of 6 percent year-over year the past five years, the Pentagon announced Thursday.
The number of suicides jumped from 285 to 325 between 2017 and 2018, according to the 2018 Annual Suicide Report, for a rate of about 22 suicides per 100,000 service members to about 25. Officials did not draw any conclusions about why the numbers continue to rise despite efforts to train commands and troops on preventing suicide and seeking behavioral health care.
“Although the suicide rate among most of our military populations is comparable to broader civilian rates, this is hardly comforting, and our numbers are not moving in the right direction,” Elizabeth Van Winkle, the Defense Department’s executive director of force resiliency, told reporters in an off-camera briefing.